NOAA Gulf of Mexico Bay Watershed Education and Training Program regional vignette

NOAA Gulf of Mexico Bay Watershed Education and Training Program regional vignette


Mobile Bay and Weeks Bay are both
estuaries; places where rivers and oceans are coming together and they form
nurseries for our world’s oceans. The watershed for Mobile Bay goes all the
way up to the Tennessee border so it is tremendous. Picking up everything from
all the different waterways and watersheds and it’s all coming down: the
litter, the pollution, the sewage. It’s all coming into Mobile Bay and then out into
the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA’s B-WET program enabled Mobile
Baykeeper to bring SWAMP into the Fairhope school system in Baldwin County
to drive home what the environment is and its importance not only for our
community and our quality of life, but also for our economy. So we’re out here
at Bailey’s Creek we’re gonna trying to do some water quality monitoring with
Fairhope High School which consists of pH, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, hardness,
and turbidity. I go into schools and teach students about their local
waterways and watersheds and then we come out once a month and collect
samples from their nearby bodies of water and their watersheds and then go
back and test them and we can see the trends over time. We didn’t want to just
educate and then have them come out monitor and get data for data’s sake. We
actually help students and teachers make a difference in the streams and creeks
they’re visiting. We enter into Water Rangers, which is an app that we use to
input all of our data. It’ll let people all around the community know what’s
going on in this water. If people have a better understanding of the connection
between the environment and our quality of life it’ll go a long way in ensuring the
future of Alabama is bright if we continue to protect and preserve these
resources in a positive way. I really believe that people will protect
something they understand and they’ll only understand something they get to
experience, so by being hands-on with this process, by going out there, seeing
the water, seeing the test results and getting that training they are going to
be far deeper invested into the future of this area and the future of the
waterways here. I think it’s important to know what’s
happening in your environment and cause and effect and how we can change that. It’s connecting the kids to the resource, teaching them all about the resource, and
then turning around and giving them the tools, the knowledge to love it. So once
you love something you learn that it’s vital that you protect it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *